Czech Republic October Prague

Gothic Prague Sights: From Prague Old Town to the St. Vitus Cathedral

Gothic Prague Sights: From Prague Old Town to the St Vitus Cathedral in Czech Republic
 

The special Bohemian magic of Prague exists in its incredibly well-preserved historical marvels, especially the Gothic Prague sights of Prague Old Town and the St. Vitus Cathedral.

Rich in both Gothic architecture and pockets of that vaguer gothic sense of spookiness that makes this season so delectable, Prague will captivate history-lovers, travel-lovers, and Halloween-lovers alike. Prague has managed to preserve so many of its historical buildings so well, accruing almost no damage during World War II, making it unique in its transportive ability to take visitors on a ride into the past.


These photographs were all taken on our Canon Rebel, but we have since upgraded to the Canon 80D and are in love with it. Make sure to check out our essential cameras for every traveler guide for more info.


 

St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague, Czech Republic

Prague was my introduction to Europe. When Lauren was studying abroad in Prague, I ventured to the medieval city to visit her. Right off the metro and into Prague Old Town, I was mesmerized by the striking architecture—the buildings too beautiful to be real, the towers that could only exist in fairy tales and history books, the castles of dreams. But they were real.  Prague is real, despite its possession of a specific kind of magic that might trick you into thinking it’s not. During my time in Prague I had to continuously give little pinches to remind myself that this wasn’t a dream.

Gothic Prague: Charles Bridge

Here I’ll go over the top Gothic Prague sights of the magnificent city. We’ll start with the Powder Gate (as I did), then the Charles Bridge, the St. Vitus Cathedral, the Prague Castle, the Church of Our Lady Before Tyn, the Old Town Hall and Astronomical Clock Tower, and finally, the Old Jewish Cemetery.

 

The Powder Gate

The first example of Gothic Prague architecture to leave a strong impression on me, the Powder Gate (or Powder Tower) makes it high on the list of top Prague sights. What struck me about the Powder Gate was its prominence against the surrounding nondescript buildings. My introduction to the wonder of Gothic Prague, the Powder Gate came into view shortly after exiting a subway station, and suddenly I felt like I was in Disneyland. The Powder Gate looked like something out of a fantasy or fairy tale, yet here it was in the midst of a random street on the way to Prague Old Town. A far cry from our Los Angeles hometown.

Powder Tower/Powder Gate in Prague
 

Constructed in the good ol’ 15th century by Vladislav II, the Powder Gate (or as the Czech’s say, Prašná brána) marks one of the original 13 city gates in Prague Old Town. Though initially intended as an attractive city entrance instead of a functional defensive structure, the Powder Gate was later used to store gunpowder in the 17th century (hence the name).  And to whom do we owe the design of this Gothic Prague wonder? Architect Peter Parler, designer of some of the most famous Gothic Prague sights (such as the Charles Bridge and St. Vitus Cathedral) likewise had his hand on the noteable Powder Gate.


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Do you appreciate spooky sights? Check out this macabre Bone Church in the Czech Republic!


Charles Bridge

By far the most famous bridge in Prague, the Charles Bridge (Karlův most) crosses the Vltava River and connects Prague Old Town with the Prague sights of the Mala Strana (Lesser Quarter),  namely the Gothic Prague Castle complex and St. Vitus Cathedral. And when did the seed of this illustrious gothic Prague bridge get planted? In 1357, when the original Charles Bridge began construction. Legend has it that the foundation stone was laid by Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV himself.

Prague, Charles Bridge, Czech Republic

One of the most famous of the top Gothic Prague sights, the Charles Bridge boasts 30 statues that line the length of the bridge. While these statues aren’t Gothic themselves, they are incredibly iconic Prague sights and supremely photogenic.

Three Gothic Prague towers protect the Charles Bridge: two on the Mala Strana side and one on the Prague Old Town side. The Old Town tower leading into the Charles Bridge is especially noted as an outstanding example of Gothic Prague architecture.

Mala Strana Charles Bridge Gothic Tower

A trip to the Prague sights isn’t complete without a stroll over the Charles Bridge. In fact, make sure to pack a good pair of walking shoes, as Prague, with its narrow cobblestone alleys, is best-explored by foot.

During my visit to Prague, Lauren and I walked across the illustrious bridge on several different days as we ventured from Prague Old Town to the St. Vitus Cathedral and the other Gothic Prague wonders beyond the river. I enjoyed strolling over the bridge in different times of the day, reveling in the splendor of the stunning vantage point created by the bridge. The Charles Bridge, and particularly a Vltava row boat experience we took under the magnificent bridge, stands out as one of the highlights from my visit.  

Charles Bridge, Prague Gothic Tower

As one of the landmarks of Gothic Prague, the Charles Bridge can get crowded at times with tourists and vendors, which can take away from its ambiance. To beat the crowds, go early in the morning or later at night. Or visit in the off-season like I did.

 

St. Vitus Cathedral

Situated within the Gothic Prague Castle complex, the St. Vitus Cathedral marks not only a prime example of Gothic Prague architecture, but is considered the largest and most significant church in the Czech Republic. Though construction of this icon began in 1344, the St. Vitus Cathedral was only finished in 1929 after nearly 600 years of being in a half-completed state.


Gothic Prague Sights - Prague Castle
 

Just like our two previous magnificent examples of Gothic Prague sites, the St. Vitus Cathedral was also designed by master architect Peter Parler.

Gothic Prague Sights: St. Vitus Cathedral

 

Trained as a sculptor and woodcarver, Peter Parler treated architecture like sculpture, and was fond of playing with structural forms in the stone. Parler imprinted the St. Vitus Cathedral with ingenious flourishes, notably the diagonal net-like pattern of vaults that run the length of the cathedral. Most Gothic vaults have only one rib spanning their width, but Parler’s vaults are doubly ribbed, creating a visually striking zigzag pattern.

Every St. Vitus Cathedral window that Parler designed has a different design in its tracery; no two windows are the same.


St. Vitus Cathedral: Prague Gothic Architecture
 

Enamored by this St. Vitus Cathedral as I was upon first impression, I couldn’t wait to explore the rest of the Gothic Prague Castle complex.

 

Prague Castle

The Prague Castle complex is the largest ancient castle in the world, at almost 70,000 square meters. As the castle is so large and old (dating to 870), exhibits almost every architectural style from the last millennium, placing it high on the list of top Prague sights.

Gothic Prague St. Vitus Cathedral
 

The notable Gothic architectural features of Prague Castle include the St. Vitus Cathedral and the massive Vladislav Hall.

When exploring Gothic Prague sites, don’t forget to look up! Take the Vladislav Hall of the Gothic Prague Castle Complex, for example. The ceiling vaults of Vladislav Hall run in intricate crisscrossing patterns for 16m down the length of the hall. These vaults represent an impressive architectural feat for the time.


Vladislav Hall, Prague Castle, Czech Republic
 

The spacious Vladislav Hall accommodated tournaments between mounted knights. The “Knight’s Stairway” was built large enough so that horses could enter and exit into the hall. The hall was once for public events during the reign of the Bohemian monarchy, while the current Czech government uses this Gothic Prague gem for official events.

Gothic Prague Cathedral
 

Due to its large size and the intricacies of the ceiling’s vaulted design, the Vladislav Hall signifies one of the most complex structural and architectural spaces of the late Middle Ages and occupies a top spot on the list of notable Gothic Prague sights.


Gothic Prague Castle, St. Vitus Cathedral
 


In the Halloween spirit? Read about LA’s best Halloween festival!


Church of Our Lady Before Tyn

There are a few anchoring landmarks that make Prague Old Town square the iconic place that it is. There’s the imposing medieval Astronomical Clock tower, the massive Jan Hus memorial, and perhaps most notably, the Church of Our Lady Before Tyn.  

 

Church of our Lady Before Tyn, Old Town Prague, Czech Republic

 

A striking landmark of Prague’s Old Town Square, the Church of Our Lady Before Tyn exemplifies Gothic Prague perfectly in its staggering spire-topped towers. Built in the 14th-15th centuries, the church’s architectural stylings were also influenced by—you guessed it—Peter Parler. Somebody get this Parler a Gothic Prague crown already.

 

Old Town Hall and Astronomical Clock

Take a gander ‘round Old Town Square and you’ll find the Prague Old Town Hall, another prominent landmark on the list of top Prague sights.

Prague Old Town Square, Czech Republic

What makes this Old Town Hall unusual as a historical building? Well, for one, it’s partly built out of several different houses at its base. Later added onto these houses was the magnificent Gothic tower that earns the hall a spot on this list of Gothic Prague sights. Additionally, a rather cool Gothic door on the side of the Old Town Hall serves as the main entrance to the hall. There once was an entire Neo-Gothic eastern wing of the Town Hall, but it was destroyed in the 1945 Prague Uprising.


Astronomical Clock, Prague, Old Town Hall
 

Now for your Gothic Prague discerning eye you can look for the Gothic tower complete with the most interesting feature of the Old Town Hall: the Astronomical Clock.

Built in the early 1400s, this Astronomical Clock in Prague Old Town is the third-oldest clock of its kind in the world and the oldest one still in operation.  The clock has dials representing the position of the Sun and Moon and other astronomical details. The clock also has moving figures of the twelve apostles and four sculptures representing things that were reviled at the time: vanity, greed, death, and lust.  Additionally, a depiction of a calendar was placed beneath the Astronomical Clock in 1490, accented by Gothic sculptures.

 


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Old Jewish Cemetery

Prague’s Old Jewish Cemetery, the largest Jewish cemetery in Europe, has a 300+ year history between the early 1400s until 1786. While the Old Jewish Cemetery of Prague Old Town may not be Gothic in terms of architecture style, it certainly possesses that certain gothic spooky imagery we all know and love, earning it a spot on this list of Prague sights.

Old Jewish Cemetary in Prague, Czech Republic

Crowded with thousands of hundreds-of-year-old tombstones, the cemetery possesses an eerie stillness on a quiet day. There are so many graves packed into the cemetery that over the years, older graves had to be covered over by newer ones, as Jewish custom prohibits the removal of any gravesite. This was carried out on such a scale that the cemetery is several meters higher than the surrounding streets, and the earth has to be held in place with walls.

Old Jewish Cemetary in Prague Old Town

The Old Jewish Cemetery was one of my favorite places that I visited in Prague. Visiting in late November, the cemetery was not as busy as it can get in other more popular times of the year. There were only a few other people visiting the cemetery that day, allowing Lauren and I to walk through the cemetery slowly and quietly. On such a day, you can really appreciate the age and solemnity of the cemetery—a very specific sense of gothic Prague spookiness distinct from other Prague sights.


Travel Tip: If you appreciate the Old Jewish Cemetery, you may also enjoy a visit to Vyšehrad Castle and cemetery outside of Prague Old Town!


 

Gothic Prague Sights

 

With it’s wealth of phenomenal architectural sights, one can wander around the quaint cobblestone streets of Prague for days and still thirst for more. Its Gothic sights are certainly not to be missed, and this guide provides a solid foundation for any intended Gothic Prague tour. However, we recommend you make sure to set plenty of time aside to explore beyond this framework as well! Beyond its wonderful historical sights, Prague’s charismatic alternative culture leftover from the youth culture of the Velvet Revolution is a breath of fresh air, and you’ll find talented street artists, musicians, and poets across the Bohemian city. So take a bit of time, enjoy the trdelník stalls, sip on a dark Czech beer (speaking of which, check out this essential Good Beer Guide to Prague and the Czech Republic!), and breathe in this beautiful intersection of past and present that make Prague the European gem that it is.

 


Want more info about this magical city? Check out this Prague guide from The Nomad’s Scrapbook!


 

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Gothic Prague Sights: From Prague Old Town to the St Vitus Cathedral in Czech Republic


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Have you visited some of these Gothic Prague sites?

Tell us about your experience in a comment below!

 

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28 Comments

  • Reply
    Joana
    October 25, 2016 at 5:59 pm

    How lovely Prague looks! Definitely one of my next trips 🙂
    Thank you so much for sharing these beautiful city with us!

    Love from Portugal,
    Joana

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:09 am

      I’m sure you’ll love it! Prague is magical!

  • Reply
    Suz
    November 1, 2016 at 5:00 pm

    So we’re heading to Prague at the end of the year and I’m in the middle of gathering inspiration for our trip. I love how you presented so much great information about the city and included such visually stunning photos. I haven’t read some of your tips anywhere else, so thanks for sharing! It makes me even more excited to visit!

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:10 am

      How lovely, Suz! Let me know if you have any questions!

  • Reply
    Maria
    November 1, 2016 at 8:03 pm

    This is the right post to read today and I must say you nailed it! The photos convey that gothic mood that you pretended. Really loved the angles and the coloring. Prague is on my list and I was wondering if should visit it on winter. Your post make think I should. Once again a great work!

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:11 am

      Prague this time of year is just so beautiful as well. Totally worth a visit!

  • Reply
    Abbie Bauer
    November 4, 2016 at 11:06 am

    I really like how you used perspective in your photography!! And I appreciate that you put in a lot of historical content along with your experience. I’ve always wanted to go to Prague because of the architecture so this post just solidified it for me!

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:12 am

      Oh you’ll definitely love Prague then, Abbie!

  • Reply
    Joaquim
    November 4, 2016 at 2:28 pm

    Wowowowow ! St Vitus Cathedral is out of this world! I can’t wait to visit it when I go to Prague. I’ve been pretty much everywhere in Europe but not Czech Republic yet so its definitely on my list 🙂

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:13 am

      Yes the St. Vitus Cathedral is definitely stunning!

  • Reply
    Natalie
    November 4, 2016 at 11:03 pm

    I just loved Prague. It was such a lovely surprise, for me, the most beautiful place ever! I’d love to spend more time there and take the kids. They would love the cathedral.

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:14 am

      In so many ways it’s like a real-life Disneyland times a million!

  • Reply
    Meg Cale
    November 5, 2016 at 3:45 am

    I haven’t been to Prague yet but this post really makes me want to go. I love the photo edits. The dark filters make it feel a little more mysterious.

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:15 am

      Prague definitely possesses that certain mysterious quality as well!

  • Reply
    Christie Sultemeier
    November 5, 2016 at 3:46 am

    Wow, it looks so different than when I went (in summer when it was sunny and vibrant). That cemetery looks a bit spooky! I just love their old town. Great info, thanks for sharing!

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:15 am

      Prague is definitely a very seasonal place, unlike LA!

  • Reply
    Kathy
    November 5, 2016 at 6:04 am

    I really enjoyed Prague. Such a beautiful city. I have been to quite a few of the sites you have mentioned but I have learnt so much more about these places from this post. Thank you for sharing it.

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:16 am

      I’m glad you enjoyed it, Kathy!

  • Reply
    Clare
    November 5, 2016 at 6:27 am

    I have been to Prague and have to admit it’s not my favourite European city. Not sure why as it has some beautiful old buildings. Maybe I need to go back and give it another go 🙂

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:16 am

      I definitely loved it myself but I know of some others who had the same experience as you! No worries though–to each their own!

  • Reply
    Allison
    November 5, 2016 at 3:34 pm

    I’m hoping to make Prague in 2018. So many interesting buildings all in one post. I tend to like modern more but I could see myself catching a few.

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 16, 2016 at 3:17 am

      Sweet! It’s totally worth a visit–let me know if you have any questions!

  • Reply
    Corinne ~ ReflectionsEnroute
    November 17, 2016 at 7:52 am

    We often visit Prague and love it. What a great place to study!

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      December 7, 2016 at 8:10 am

      It really was a fantastic place to study! Glad you enjoy Prague!

  • Reply
    Vaclav Sulista
    November 23, 2016 at 6:52 pm

    Please call our country Czechia, there was no republic at times of gothic 🙂 http://www.goczechia.com

    • Reply
      Lauren West
      November 27, 2016 at 2:24 am

      Thank you so much for your input, Vaclav!

  • Reply
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